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Blue Blossoms

Blue isn’t a color But it should be. But it isn’t. But you know that? But you don’t? I don’t know what you can see. The blue light in my eyes. You’ve been staring at the sun. And the sunspot gives me thought. And your eyelids’ lids are lost. So it be. And so it be. Alone does not define me You have lost. No you have won. I lost along. You must have known. I couldn’t see. I couldn’t see. You must have heard. You don’t know me. You didn’t do.

I never act. You’ve lost your way. You’ve lost your last. We need to stop. But how to start? You need to stop. You need my heart. You never won. You never saw. You’re not my son. Lost after all.


Written by Daniel E. Cummins, Jr.


Author's Notes- "Blue Blossoms explores the emotionality of isolation and relationships during this trying time and the unspoken tension and loss of love that can occur between family members, especially when communication breaks down and conversations fail to happen often anywhere but in the members’ imaginations. How much of the poem is a true conversation between a father and a son? How much is mental? Is the son in the poem the speaker’s true son, or is it simply the speaker conversing with himself? Is the speaker saying that the entity is “not his son” an admission of the explicit fact that it is not, or is he disowning his (or her) child? All of these questions dredge up intense emotion, at least in this author, and warrant examination for every reader (who can form their own opinions as to the answer), especially during this time of crisis and isolation with family."


-> Best Submission- Rhyme or Reason- April 2020

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